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Campus Activities Board
Cody Rogers(cbrogers)
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 5:43 PM
Joined: 10/24/2008
Posts: 8


We are looking for more information about developing a campus activities student programming board. If you would be willing to share the following.....

1. The highs and lows of having a programming board

2. How your board is structured?

3. How the board is are funded?

4. Who is paid, who is a volunteer?

5. What strategies do you use to help with retention of board memebrs (ie. stipends or other benefits)?

6. How do you recruit board members? (especially the non-executive or non-paid members).

 

Thanks!

Cody Rogers, UAF

 


Beth Bailey(bethbailey)
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 9:34 AM
Joined: 11/12/2007
Posts: 38


Cody,

Here are a few thoughts on having a programming board:

1.  Students receive excellent leadership skills, event-planning skills, and life lessons when working on a programming board.  They are able to contribute to other students' collegiate experience.  The programming board and advisors also serve as a support system and family to board members.

2.  We have nine committees, plus the Exec Board (one president, three vice presidents).  Each committee programs certain types of events.  See attached constitution.

3.  We receive money from student privilege fees (which are reviewed every three years), some administrative funds (university/union funds), and self-generated funds such as movie or concert ticket sales.

4.  No one is paid.  The president receives a $250 book stipend per semester.  The rest of the board receives no stipened, though they receive a t-shirt, datebook, and various perks such as getting into the films and occasional events for free.

5.  We have a VP for Membership who focuses on retention of exec board members, as well as committee members.  We have a program called yoUr Participation Counts for committee members where they volunteer and receive "points" for attending or assisting with various programs in order to receive small perks such as movie tickets, t-shirt, candy bar, etc...

6.  We recruit by sending e-mails/flyers/e-blasts/tweets/Facebook messages, etc... to Greeks, residence halls, leadership studies, minority student organizations, all organization presidents/advisors, international students, non-trad students/veterans, graduate students, past cosponsors of events, and GLBT department/student organization.

 

If you need more assistance, I would be happy to share any documents with you such as application for positions, etc...

 

Good luck,

Beth Bailey

K-State Student Union

Kansas State University

785-532-7326


File Attachment(s):
4.15.09 - UPC Constitution with ALL Changes.doc (87552 bytes)

Jeff Lail(jefflail)
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 4:49 PM
Joined: 1/8/2009
Posts: 43


Hey Cody,

1. The highs and lows of having a programming board

Being in leadership on a programming board is a truly unique experience to get students to contribute to the college experience for the whole student body.  The support system mentioned by Beth is something I've noticed as well.  One challenge is keeping these super involved students paying attention to classes and grades.

2. How your board is structured? 

We have a core team consisting of Pres, VP, and Business Manager.  We have five committee chairs (Leisure, Special Events, Concerts, Publicity, Comedy). 

3. How the board is are funded?

The board is funded by the Activities Fee that also funds the rec center and student center.

4. Who is paid, who is a volunteer?

The core and committee chairs are paid.  Core makes $200/month. Committee chairs make $150.  We have a group of volunteers that are what we call "general body"

5. What strategies do you use to help with retention of board members (ie. stipends or other benefits)?

Stipends.  Giveaways for volunteers that we call cabbie levels.  Basically, the more you volunteer, the closer you get to "full cabbie".  I can send you some details on this if you're interested.

6. How do you recruit board members? (especially the non-executive or non-paid members).

The ones who get full cabbie are usually the ones in line for board positions


Larry Mosher(larrym46)
Posted: Thursday, December 22, 2011 10:57 AM
Joined: 4/9/2007
Posts: 112


Cody I hope this is helpful- Larry/Jessica

1. The highs and lows of having a programming board

Lows: Funding. Since our funding is determined by our Student Senate, they have the ultimate control of what our budget will look like each year. Because of the increasing number of student organizations looking for funding from Senate, the amount of funding we receive has continued to decrease. This forces the board to try and find new ways to make events happen and can be difficult due to the rising prices of goods and services.

Interest. Since our board strives to create events for all types of students we sometimes get negative feedback from other organizations on campus who do not like an event we sponsored. For example, our concerts usually draw a great deal of attention. The comments and feedback we receive can be harsh and for the students that put the work in to make the event happen that can be very discouraging. Even when they are doing surveys and asking other students for their feedback, it does not mean that they can please everyone.

Highs: Co-Sponsoring. Though we have the largest student organization budget, it does not mean that we can do every event that we think would be successful, or that we think of every "cool" event possible. Because of this, we work to co-sponsor events with smaller organizations who might not have the budget, supplies or manpower to pull off an event they are interested in. We can work with them to help create the event. A great deal of organizations want to work with us for funding reasons, which you have to be careful about, but some organizations just want your ability to reach students, your help with brainstorming or with getting them connected to reliable companies to contract with for events.  Being able to help other organizations gives our board a chance to mentor others, connect with new students, share ideas, get feedback and improve the quality of programming on campus by the use of teamwork.

Ownership. Having a programming board means having a centralized location for event programming.  The students can share brainstorming ideas, pass down tips from year to year and build the character of the campus' programming. Most programming boards are passionate about having fun and love what they do. (The energy and enthusiasm at conferences is AMAZING!) Being a part of the board is like having another little family on campus and gives them excellent real world experience with multi tasking, working with professionals, contracts, evaluations, marketing, planning, communication and more.

2. How your board is structured?

Though the structure of the board changes every couple of years due to funding changes and overall changes in campus interests, our programming board is set-up to have 12 executive members. President, Vice President, Traditional Events, Films, Special Events, Public Relations, Late Night, Graphic Design, Cultural Arts, Concerts, Out and About, Comedy. The Assistant Director of Student Activities is their advisor.  Our Vice President is in charge of developing a committee to help with events. These are usually freshman who are interested in being a part of the board but want to test the water first.

3. How the board is are funded?

Our board is currently funded through money from the student activities fee charged to all students. Our Student Senate decides how the funds will be disbursed to all student organizations.  

4. Who is paid, who is a volunteer?

All 12 of the executive members receive a stipend quarterly. Our committee is volunteer only.

5. What strategies do you use to help with retention of board memebrs (ie. stipends or other benefits)?

Though the executives receive stipends, it can still be challenging to keep them on board. We try to provide them with a "family" environment where all executives and committee members are there to help and give them "perks" like meet and greets with the bands, free t-shirts and free food at events. They also get first chance at tickets for off campus events (usually to Chicago) that the board sponsors.  Other small things we do include, celebrating each others' birthdays, having a monthly "outing" where committee and execs can hangout and get to know each other without working an event, and preview parties. Preview parties happen a few days before our board shows a film on campus. Since we need to make sure that the video has no issues before we share it with the public, we all get together for dinner and movie.

6. How do you recruit board members? (especially the non-executive or non-paid members).

Word of mouth through our current executives is a big part of our recruitment process. We try to harvest leadership from our committee as well as post things in facebook, display cases and in the dorms talking about who we are, what we do and why they should join. We then put out applications, hold interviews and hire executives.

Thanks!

Cody Rogers, UAF


***************

ACUI


 

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