About ACUI Board of Trustees

The ACUI Board of Trustees is elected by the ACUI membership and is responsible for the strategic and fiduciary direction of the Association. The board includes the president, president-elect, past president, six to eight at-large members, the ACUI executive director, and legal counsel (both nonvoting members). At least one board member must be a student.

Meeting Minutes

Approved meeting minutes are available in [PDF] format:
2016Archived 1998-2015

 

Committees

The board consists of any number of committees, created each year, based on need. Currently, the board has four standing committees: 

Finance Committee

Governance Committee

Strategic Direction

Executive Committee

 

Finance Committee

The Finance Committee is responsible for assisting the board in ensuring that the organization is in good fiscal health. The work of the committee revolves around five major areas.

  • Ensure that accurate and complete financial records are maintained.
    • Review and recommend financial policies to the board, including ensuring adequate internal controls and maintaining financial records in accordance with standard accounting practices.
    • Comply with federal, state, and any other requirements related to the organization’s finances.
    • Ensure that the IRS Form 990, other forms, and employment and other taxes required by government are filed completely, correctly, and on time.
     
  • Ensure that accurate, timely, and meaningful financial statements are prepared, analyzed, and presented to the board with commentary on a quarterly basis.
  • Oversee budget preparation and financial planning.
    • Propose for board approval a budget that reflects the Association’s goals and board policies.  As part of the preparation process, consult the other committees of the board about financial priorities and concerns.
    • Ensure that the budget accurately reflects the needs, expenses, and revenue of the organization.
    • Assess the budget’s impact on the Association’s long-term financial strategies.
     
  • Safeguard the organization’s assets.
    • Review proposed new initiatives for ongoing financial implications, recommending approval or disapproval to the board.
    • Ensure that the Association has the proper risk-management provisions in place.
    • Ensure that the Association maintains adequate insurance coverage.
     
  • Help the full board understand the organization’s financial affairs.
    • Ensure that the board as a whole is well informed about the Association’s finances.
    • Educate the board about financial matters.
     

 

Governance Committee

The Governance Committee is responsible for ongoing review and recommendations to enhance the quality and future viability of the board. It focuses on the following four areas, with specific duties dependent on board needs at any specific time, as well as evolving practice:

  • Board role and responsibilities
    • Lead the board in regularly reviewing and updating its role and areas of responsibility, and the expectations of individual trustees.
    • Assist the board in periodically updating and clarifying primary areas of focus—the board’s agenda for itself for the next one to two years based on the strategic plan.
     
  • Board composition
    • Lead assessment of the current and anticipated needs for board composition.
    • Develop a profile of the board as it should evolve over time.
    • Determine the knowledge, attitudes, skills, abilities, and influence that the board will need to address issues that will arise in the foreseeable future.
    • Nominate qualified individuals under criteria to be elected as board trustees.
    • Create awareness of volunteer opportunities within the Association, including service on the board.
     
  • Board knowledge
    • Design a process of orientation, including information prior to election and during first cycle of board activity for new members (usually one year).
    • Design and implement an ongoing training and education program for board members.
     
  • Board effectiveness
    • Initiate the periodic assessment of the board’s performance and propose, as appropriate, changes in board structure, roles, and responsibilities.
    • Provide ongoing counsel to the president and other board leaders on steps they might take to enhance board effectiveness.
    • Regularly review the board’s practices regarding member participation, conflict of interest, confidentiality, etc., and suggest improvements as needed.
    • Periodically review and update the board’s policy guidelines and practices.
     

 

Strategic Direction

The Strategic Direction Committee is responsible for organizing and overseeing the development, assessment, and communication of the strategic plan. The strategic direction committee will enhance the quality and future viability of the Association by providing a blueprint for a well-considered plan to keep the Association moving in a unified direction. The committee’s work focuses on the following areas, with specific duties dependent on board needs at any specific time, as well as evolving practice:

  • On a regular basis, lead a strategic plan review process that takes into consideration current and anticipated internal and external opportunities and challenges. Revise the strategic plan as necessary ensuring opportunities for Association-wide input and buy-in, and communicating with the membership.
  • Work with the Finance Committee to ensure all financial opportunities and constraints are calculated into the plan and that the plan has been developed within a sound and realistic financial framework.
  • Present an annual update on progress of the strategic plan.
  • Oversee volunteer component groups in developing action plans and monitor, assess, and support their efforts.
  • Monitor, assess, and support the Central Office Operational Plan through the executive director.

 

Executive Committee

The Executive Committee is responsible for working in support of, or occasionally in place of, the full board. The committee is comprised of three permanent members: the president, president-elect, and executive director. The work of the committee revolves around six major areas:

  • Perform policy work.
    • Carry out specific directions of the board and take action on policies when they affect the work of the executive committee or the when the full board directs them to do so.
     
  • Act as liaison to the executive director.
    • Nurture the executive director by providing counsel, feedback, and support during weekly telephone conference calls.
    • Facilitate annual assessment of the executive director by the board and report the results to the executive director.
     
  • Conduct executive searches.
    • Assume the lead in the search for a new executive director or delegate the responsibility to a task force or other entity.
    • Use available research to determine an appropriate salary for the executive director.
    • Seek approval from the full board before hiring a new executive director.
     
  • With help from the Association’s attorney, write, negotiate, execute, and update executive director’s contract.
  • Handle urgent issues.
    • Resolve an emergency or organizational crisis (e.g., loss of funding, catastrophic event, or unexpected loss of chief executive).
     
  • Set the agenda for the full board meeting.

The role of the Executive Committee is also defined by what it cannot do. To avoid delegating essential powers away from the full board, the executive committee cannot:

  • Determine its role in the organization
  • Elect or remove board members
  • Hire or fire the executive director
  • Approve or change the budget
  • Make major structural decisions (add or eliminate programs, approve mergers, or dissolve the Association)

 

Updated Nov. 28, 2016